911   We all know how important it is to teach our children about dialing 911 in the event of an emergency. Some already know to call 911 by now, some are still learning. Here’s some resources I’ve come across to incorporate into our lesson to get an understanding of just how much my daughter knows.   Let’s talk about some sorts of emergencies.  A little fire in the house is an emergency.  A bad guy coming into the house is an emergency, an unconscious family member is an emergency.  Being unconscious is when you fall or get hurt and it looks like you’re sleeping but can’t wake up even if someone shakes you. In all of these emergencies you need help.  You can get the help you need by getting a phone, turning it on and dialing 9-1-1.   (Note to parents: Always refer to the emergency number as “nine-one-one” not “nine-eleven.” In an emergency, a child may not know how to dial the number correctly because of trying to find the “eleven” button on the phone.)   A little fire in the house, an unconscious person and a bad guy in the house are all things that would require a call to 911. A skinned knee, a stolen bicycle, or a lost pet wouldn’t.  If ever in doubt and there’s no adult around to ask, make the call. It’s much better to be safe than sorry.   When you call 9-1-1 someone will pick up and be able to help you. But first they need to ask you some questions.  They might ask you…  
  • What’s your emergency?
  • Where are you calling from? (Where do you live?)
  • What’s your name?
  • Who needs help?
  • Is the person awake and breathing?
  It’s OK to be frightened in an emergency, but it’s important to stay calm, speak slowly and clearly, and give as much detail to the 911 operator as possible.  The operator will send firemen, police, or doctors to our house to help.  You should open the door when they come and take them to the emergency.   If there is a big fire in the house you must run from the house to our neighbors (tell you children which neighbors you trust and make sure they know how to get to their house).  Our neighbor will help you call 9-1-1 from their house, but it’s important to get away from the fire to be safe first.   Okay, let’s practice!   Use the practice keypad or a telephone to have each child just practice touching 9 then 1 then 1.  Make sure they are familiar with the keys to touch before moving on to practice drills.   (get two telephones that are turned off, so they don’t actually dial, and role-play with your child as themselves and you as the 911 operator)   dial 911   Practice #1 – Mommy is carrying a basket of laundry up the stairs. She trips and falls down the stairs. When you see her laying on the floor you talk to her, but she doesn’t answer you.  What should you do? (call 9-1-1)  
  • What’s your emergency?
  • Where are you calling from? (Where do you live?)
  • What’s your name?
  • Who needs help?
  • Is the person awake and breathing?
  • I’ll send an ambulance right away.
  Practice #2 – You smell smoke and walk into the kitchen.  The toaster has a lot of smoke coming out of it and you see flames.  What should you do? (Tell anyone else at home and run to a trusted neighbor’s house. Then call 9-1-1)   Practice #3 –  You hear a noise downstairs and see a stranger in the house.  Your parents aren’t home. What should you do? (call 9-1-1)  
  • What’s your emergency?
  • Where are you calling from? (Where do you live?)
  • What’s your name?
  • Who needs help?
  • Is the person awake and breathing?
  • I’ll send the police right away.
  Practice #4 – You want to go bike riding with your friends and you search and search, but you can’t find your bike. What should you do? (DON’T call 9-1-1. This is NOT an emergency).   When we are safe and know how to handle an emergency we can feel safe in our home.   Here’s some of the curriculum we used:
 

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